Michael Nowakowski / NBN
For students who need to use medical marijuana, the Illinois medical program has done little, and decriminalization would be an imperceptible change.
Charlie Rhoad, 9:00 p.m.

On Tuesday, students gathered in the Norris Lake room, where a multitude of seats were surrounded with a circular array of eight PA speakers. Each seat contained a black eye mask, similar to what one would wear while they sleep. The audience was instructed to put on the masks as the lights were turned off and the show began.

The event, titled “The World According To Sound”, is an audio-visual (or really, non-visual) experience hosted by radio producers Chris Hoff and Sam Harnett. They also host a show of the same name on NPR’s “All Things Considered”. While each episode of the radio show is usually around 90 seconds, analyzing one sound in depth, this live show lasted nearly an hour and a half, focusing on the sounds being played, with the occasional narration from Hoff and Harnett describing what the audience was hearing.

The sounds ranged from high-depth recordings of giraffes, mud lots and the Golden Gate Bridge ...

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Rachel Hawley, Oct. 17, 2017

Former Governor Martin O’Malley at Cahn on Monday night.

Photo by Ben Bomier / North by Northwestern

Rarely a day goes by when I don’t think about where we are right now as a country,” said former Maryland governor Martin O’Malley with a wistful tone, “and how it might have been changed.”

On Oct. 16, the former governor, Baltimore mayor, and brief 2016 presidential candidate spoke to an audience of about 50 students in Cahn Auditorium. The event, sponsored by College Democrats as their fall speaker event, was moderated by New York Times columnist and Pulitzer Prize winner for commentary Eugene Robinson.

O’Malley spoke at length about the challenges of mounting a presidential campaign in 2016, noting that even as a primary contender on the Democratic side, the circus of Donald Trump’s candidacy presented an insurmountable obstacle.

“I’ve never had a more frustrating experience in my life than trying to put forward a thoughtful candidacy ...

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Audrey Valbuena, Oct. 15, 2017

“Hello, fellow anomaly. Who are you?” read Trevor Noah, from his New York Times best-selling book Born a Crime, quoting an Indian boy from his elementary school days who noticed Noah’s paralysis in being an “in-between” race: not completely Black, and definitely not white.

It wasn’t until he spoke a variety of African languages to his fellow Black schoolmates that they accepted him, and Noah chose which side to be: Black.

On Oct. 15, Noah appeared before an audience of Medill students (and a few lucky others) in Cahn Auditorium to discuss race and identity in the current state of America. Sponsored by the New York Times as part of their “Get with the Times” speaker series, the event was meant to engage young people about topics that we face in the world today. Current Times reporter John Eligon (Medill '04) moderated.

The host of The Daily Show spoke about his identity as an Black African in America ...

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Rachel Hawley, Oct. 15, 2017

Would-be audience members were already beginning to line up outside of Shanley Pavilion well in advance of the Friday night opening when an inexplicable message appeared on Facebook:

“All performances for Pippin have been cancelled. All cast and crew members are healthy and uninjured. We apologize for this inconvenience and will be offering more details as soon as possible.”

The sudden cancellation of Pippin, the first production this year from Arts Alliance, Northwestern’s oldest student-run theater board, has been the subject of shock and consternation throughout the theater community. In the days following Pippin’s cancellation, rumors swirled that Arts Alliance had lost their license to perform the show. The truth proved even more surprising: The group had never actually acquired the rights to Pippin to begin with.

“It was absolutely devastating,” said Cammy Harris, director of Pippin, two weeks after Pippin’s untimely cancellation.

So, how did Arts Alliance end up in the bizarre situation of having not ...

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Rachel Hawley, Oct. 15, 2017

Would-be audience members were already beginning to line up outside of Shanley Pavilion well in advance of the Friday night opening when an inexplicable message appeared on Facebook:

“All performances for Pippin have been cancelled. All cast and crew members are healthy and uninjured. We apologize for this inconvenience and will be offering more details as soon as possible.”

The sudden cancellation of Pippin, the first production this year from Arts Alliance, Northwestern’s oldest student-run theater board, has been the subject of shock and consternation throughout the theater community. In the days following Pippin’s cancellation, rumors swirled that Arts Alliance had lost their license to perform the show. The truth proved even more surprising: The group had never actually acquired the rights to Pippin to begin with.

“It was absolutely devastating,” said Cammy Harris, director of Pippin, two weeks after Pippin’s untimely cancellation.

So, how did Arts Alliance end up in the bizarre situation of having not ...

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Rachel Hawley, Oct. 9, 2017

Martin O'Malley

Photo from Wikimedia Commons

Former Maryland Governor and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Martin O’Malley will speak at Cahn Auditorium Monday, Oct. 16, in a conversation with Washington Post columnist and Pulitzer Prize winner Eugene Robinson.

Northwestern University College Democrats announced O’Malley as their fall speaker in an email over their listserv on Monday night. O’Malley served as Mayor of Baltimore from 1999 until he was elected Governor of Maryland in 2007 and served two terms. Many speculate that he is the inspiration for Tommy Carcetti, the fictional Mayor of Baltimore from HBO’s The Wire.

He received national attention as a candidate for the Democratic nomination for president in 2016, but was only in contention in one state. He dropped out after receiving less than one percent of the vote in the Iowa caucus.

Tickets for the event will be free for Northwestern students and $10 for the public.

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Rachel Hawley, Oct. 3, 2017
Northwestern will seek to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, according to the five-year Strategic Sustainability Plan released on the University website earlier today.

The plan, the first of its kind at Northwestern, categorizes its goals into five major areas relating to resource conservation, sustainable energy use, and green transportation. As University president Morton Shapiro noted today in the announcement, ““We have an obligation to future generations to reduce our carbon footprint, yes – but also a tremendous opportunity to contribute to global climate solutions.”

But how will students be affected by the plan? Here are four of the University’s most ambitious goals with regards to sustainability, and how they may impact student life:

1. Reducing energy consumption by 20 percent by 2020

If you haven’t shaken the habit of leaving the lights on in your dorm room in your hurry to get to class, now might be a good time to do so. Northwestern intends to reduce ...

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Rachel Oh, Oct. 2, 2017

Northwestern Fall 2017 Internship & Job Fair

Photo by Rachel Oh

There's no need to run back home in between classes to change into business suits anymore. Northwestern Career Advancement adopted a business casual dress code for on-campus employer events since the onset of Fall Quarter, with the exception of employer interviews.

NCA began to act on the idea since last Spring Quarter. As a first step, NCA created a page on its website explaining what a business casual dress code looks like. NCA also sent emails to different student groups and campus partners, created television advertisements across campus, distributed flyers, and included dress code disclaimers for automatic career event reminder emails.

“A lot of students were telling us that they were self-selecting out of events because they didn’t feel like they had the appropriate attire,” said Geni Harclerode, NCA’s director of employer recruitment and engagement. “It concerned us a lot to think that any student wouldn’t ...

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Maggie Harden, Oct. 1, 2017

Cook County passed an ordinance earlier this summer that will gradually raise the minimum wage from the state-mandated $8.25 an hour to $13 an hour earlier. As a result, Evanston’s minimum wage increased to $10 an hour beginning July 1.

Towns in the county could choose to opt out if desired, which Evanston neighbor Wilmette did within weeks since the wage hike became official. Back in July, Evanston mayor Steve Hagerty called an emergency meeting to discuss potentially passing an opt-out measure, but the meeting shut down after a crowd of 150 protesters (including Rep. Jan Schakowsky) showed up outside City Hall to advocate for the increase.

"I support implementation of the Cook County minimum wage ordinance,” Hagerty told the Chicago Tribune after the protestors successfully prevented the meeting. “I believe the community has spoken loud and clear.”

For Northwestern students, Evanston’s wage increase means that everyone employed through work-study, or through university-sponsored “temp” jobs, are now ...

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Rachel Hawley, Oct. 1, 2017

Incident reports of rape at Northwestern significantly increased in 2016, according to the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report sent to students via email on Sept. 29.

The annual report, which is released Oct. 1 each year, details crime statistics over the past three calendar years, and includes data regarding on-campus fires. According to the report, 13 incidents of rape were reported on the Evanston campus during the 2016 calendar year, with 15 incidents reported on the Chicago campus that same year. This represents a marked increase from the nine total reported incidents of rape in 2015 (eight on the Evanston campus, one on the Chicago campus) and four total reported incidents in 2014 (three on the Evanston campus, one on the Chicago campus).

It is impossible to know for certain whether the increase in reported rapes could be related to a recent increase in incidents of sexual assault on campus, or an increasing rate of sexual assaults being reported ...

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Yoonjie Park, Oct. 1, 2017

Students living in suite-style residences Kemper, Slivka and the newly opened 560 Lincoln received a notice from their Resident Assistants that they would be responsible for cleaning their own bathrooms throughout the year. Starting Winter Quarter, once toilet paper dispensers are updated and hand soap dispensers removed, residents will also have to buy their own toilet paper and hand soap.

Residential Services revised the policy over summer break. Assistant Vice President of Residential and Dining Services Paul Riel asked Residential Services to give “additional consideration to the dynamics of private spaces that the university enters regularly,” according to Jennifer Luttig-Komrosky, executive director of residential services.

While looking at residential spaces, Residential Services realized there was “an inconsistency” when it came to cleaning policies for private and semi-private bathrooms. The new policy comes from a desire to prioritize student privacy and to make the cleaning policies consistent.

Residents initially heard they would have to provide their own cleaning supplies as part ...

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Rachel Hawley, Sept. 27, 2017

Naruto Run Facebook Event

Did you receive an invitation last month to a Facebook event titled “Run Thru Deering Meadow Naruto Style”? If so, you’re not alone.

More than 2,000 people, mostly Northwestern students, responded “going” or “interested” to the event created on Facebook on August 8th. No, it’s not a running competition of any kind as you might imagine. Rather, two seniors, Jonathan Huang and Sebastian Garcia, created the event as the latest iteration of a meme that has blown up in popularity on college campuses over the past few months. At schools such as the University of Michigan, Georgia Tech, MIT, NYU, and Boston College, similar Facebook events have popped up, referencing the distinctive running style of iconic anime character Naruto Uzumaki.

The Naruto Run

gif courtesy of darkwin17

“I initially didn’t expect this kind of love for Naruto,” said Huang. “But I’m so happy to have seen it take off.”

Similar “Naruto ...

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Rachel Hawley, Sept. 25, 2017

South African comedian and host of Comedy Central’s The Daily Show Trevor Noah will speak at Cahn Auditorium on Sunday, Oct. 15, in an event titled “Trevor Noah: Race And Identity in America Now.” The event, sponsored by Medill, will be moderated by Medill alum and New York Times reporter John Eligon.

Noah is perhaps best known for replacing long-time Daily Show host Jon Stewart back in 2015. Born in Soweto, South Africa, his other comedic work focuses on his upbringing as a mixed-race child under Apartheid. In 2016, his autobiography, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood, became a New York Times bestseller.

On The Daily Show, Noah is known for drawing comparisons between present-day American politics and those of his upbringing in South Africa. He often compares Donald Trump to an African dictator or recounts his experience as a person of color both in South Africa and the United States in his segments.

Medill students ...

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Priyanka Godbole, Sept. 24, 2017
Photo courtesy of the U.S. State Department

The Contemporary Thought Speaker Series, along with the Global Engagement Summit and the Department of Political Science, will bring former Ambassador to the U.N. Samantha Power to speak at Tech auditorium on Oct. 2 at 7:30 p.m.

Besides working as ambassador, Power served on former President Obama’s National Security Council and worked as a senior adviser to his first presidential campaign. She is also well-known for her book A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide.

“Ambassador Power has been a powerful voice on every corner of foreign policy for almost two decades, so we are so excited to hear from her during such a crucial and unique time in global affairs,” CTSS chair Ben Zimmermann said in a press release.

Power began her career as a freelance reporter in Bosnia and went on to cover the Rwandan genocide, critiquing the Clinton administration’s foreign policy ...

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Natalie Escobar, Sept. 20, 2017

Sekile Nzinga-Johnson has joined the Women’s Center as their new director, according to an email announcement from the Women’s Center. She officially started on September 12.

The center had been conducting a search after director Renee Redd retired in Winter 2016 after 21 years of leading the center. Interim director Alecia Wartowski had been serving as interim director and director of programs in the meantime, as the Women’s Center celebrated its 30th anniversary. Last Fall, an email from the Office of the Provost ignited controversy when it announced the “integration” of the center’s counseling services with Counseling and Psychological Service and and Sara Walz left her position as the center's counselor.

Here are some highlights from Nzinga-Johnson’s biography:

Her work focuses on the intersections of race, class, gender and public policy. Before arriving at the Women’s Center, she was the senior director of programs at the Chicago-based Health & Medicine Policy Research Group, an ...

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